Canine Influenza Update – 1/11/18

As you may have heard, cases of canine influenza are now occurring in the South Bay Area. This virus, which is not transmissible to people, usually causes upper respiratory symptoms including coughing and sneezing, nasal discharge, and fever. Less commonly, dogs can become lethargic and, rarely, they can develop pneumonia. Dogs at risk include those who have been to doggie daycare, dog parks, boarding facilities, pet food stores, groomers, or other places where dogs congregate.

The good news is that most cases resolve without intervention, similar to a cold in humans or “kennel cough” in dogs.

If your young, otherwise healthy dog is showing symptoms and may have been exposed recently but has a good energy level, appetite, and is breathing normally, we encourage you to keep your dog at home, provide rest and plenty of fluids, and keep an eye on him or her.

If your dog is lethargic, breathing with effort or an increased rate, or you are worried, please call us at Adobe.

If you have an older dog or one with serious medical conditions like heart disease, and your dog starts coughing, we also encourage you to give us a call.

We can advise you whether to schedule an appointment, come in on urgent care, or continue to monitor at home.

If your dog is suspected to have or is diagnosed with canine influenza, you should keep your dog isolated from other dogs for 4 weeks.

While the disease caused by the virus is usually mild and self-resolving, we are taking precautions to ensure the safety of our patients. We have dedicated certain rooms to dogs with respiratory signs, and our staff and doctors wear personal protective equipment (PPE) when handling patients or samples from suspected cases. We are also thoroughly cleaning and disinfecting all areas where suspect cases and their owner may have been.

We encourage you to get more information by looking at these sites:

https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/CanineInfluenza.aspx

https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/FAQs/Pages/Control-of-Canine-Influenza-in-Dogs.aspx

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